People

Chapter 6B: What Works Better

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From Oral to Written Tradition

Chapter 6A: Looking for Power in all the Wrong Places (Steps 1-3)

Chapter 6B: Transmuting Emotions into Usable Power (Steps 4-9)
Given a perceived absence of Power in Choice—and the difficulties in just looking for More Power—the Stepper looks for an alternative and discovers the ability to Transmute (perpetually occurring) Emotions into Power that can be used to choose to drink or not drink. No longer necessary are spiritual experiences that always dissipate or conscious contact with a Higher Power that is constantly disconnecting. All that is needed is the properly harnessed Power of ordinary human experience, a Power which is always present & never dissipates, just waiting for someone with the courage to embrace their character defects, rather than inventory & pray them away.

VIDEO HIGHLIGHT: The 5 Milestones of Spiritual Awakening

VIDEO HIGHLIGHT: The Gauntlet of Self

Chapter 6C: Neutralizing Power (Steps 10 & 11)

From Written to Oral Tradition

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Chapter 5

HOW IT WORKS

Chapter 6

INTO ACTION

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Chapter 6

WHAT WORKS BETTER

Excerpt: Moving From “Number One Offender” to “Core Orientation”

…6.24 Believing without question Wilson’s ridiculous admonition to be “free from anger,” many in AA are deathly afraid of their own anger. We have seen it over and over again in meetings: express honest hurt to the point of self-pity and you are consoled; express honest anger even if it be mild irritation and you will be accused of not working your program. Spiritual adults feel their feelings—including anger. To quiet yourself in the midst of a disturbance is only a stop-gap measure that misses a chance to experience ourselves in a new way—even if it be unflattering. Some spiritual traditions even suggest that when you get angry, try to become angrier and learn how arbitrary your feeling was. To be able to feel anger to the point of rage—without reacting or expressing—is to live without resentment. This applies whether or not resentment is your number one offender.

6.25 There is no better way to guarantee resentment than trying to live without anger. Because resentment is anger only partially felt, it is inevitably re-felt. If you have resentment you can be sure that you are not feeling your anger; if you feel your anger you can sure that you will never get resentment.

6.26 Effort, yielding Power, is the least effective tool for ridding ourselves of any offending emotion. It matters little whether you try to apply Self-Will or God’s help. Lacking the Self-Knowledge to Transmute disturbing emotions into stable Power, we throw away the value of ordinary experience in favor of a search for the unstable Power of spiritual experience that may never arise. This is just one of the many places where we find the human Power to relieve our alcoholism—completely unknown to the vast majority who use the Big Book template.

© 2019 Michael V. Cossette

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Chapters 5 & 6

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Chapter 6

6.27 Today’s Stepper justifies many errant ways to shield themselves from their emotions. The seemingly reasonable “Praying for others who offend us” is one such shield. When people who have wronged us, we do not know whether they are spiritually sick, evil, or just don’t care. For us to conveniently label someone else as sick in order to mute our feelings towards them is false compassion. And to pray for them does seem to work, but it just pushes the anger down so that it will surface at some later confluence of time, place, and person unrelated to the original offending experience. “Serenity Now; Insanity Later.”

6.28 By over-emphasizing “keeping their side of the street clean,” many in AA never get past blaming themselves or preaching to others that they need to keep their side of the street clean. We are not individuals travelling separate streets at separate times; we are a community simultaneously travelling a multi-lane highway. To keep traffic moving smoothly we need to learn how to honk the horn when someone gets in our lane. Without the ability to hold other people accountable for their behavior in a positive, purposeful way—never addressed in AA—our constant focus on ourselves feeds into a hands-off attitude towards others, and festers an isolationist attitude towards the world. This is how one squanders a spiritual inheritance…

…transcription to be continued…MVC

© 2019 Michael V. Cossette

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Chapters 5 & 6

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Chapter 6

© 2019 Michael V. Cossette

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Chapters 5 & 6

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Chapter 6

© 2019 Michael V. Cossette

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Chapters 5 & 6

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© 2019 Michael V. Cossette

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